Teen Titans #28

Adam Glass, script
Bernard Chang, art
Marcello Maiolo, colors
Rob Leigh, letters

This issue is the start of a new story arc. Damien introduces the Teen Titans to the newest target, Deathstroke. Red Arrow confronts Damien for not telling her first and warns him about the risk involved in taking down an adversary with his skills. Deathstroke has fought almost every hero in the DC Universe, as the issue explains, and he’s always walked away. Damien employs a creative approach and utilizes every member’s strengths in the process. However, Deathstroke has more than one trick up his sleeve and his sights are focused on Robin.

The most interesting part of this story is the chess match that takes place between Damien and Deathstroke. I liked how the writer cuts to the chase having the Teen Titans confront Slade Wilson early on in the issue. It sets the tone that the conflict is less about the hand to hand combat, initially, and more about the psychology. For example, Deathstroke warns Damien that he didn’t think this through and therefore he’s going to stick around until Damien learns his lesson. And again, Kid Flash’s decision to save Deathstroke during The Lazarus Contract resurfaced and caused Damian to question his reliability to the team. Deathstroke has a long and adversarial history with the Teen Titans, which adds to the weight of the story. Deathstroke, a.k.a. Slade Wilson, is perhaps the best combatant in the DC universe.

The art in the book was strong and never took me out of the story. One of the most interesting visuals in DC is Slade Wilson who’s an old and grizzled-looking man. The rendition in this book does not disappoint. The artist accurately portrays Damien as surly, bratty, and arrogant by his facial expressions and body language. However, it’s the images of Damien waking up with PTSD-flashbacks at the beginning of the issue, which elevates his humanity and strikes compassion in the reader.

Overall = 9.5/10

Final Impressions

This issue begins a new crossover event between Teen Titans and Deathstroke. It sets the stage for Robin and Kid Flash to step up for the team and leaves room for the story to grow. Why Deathstroke, why now? I’m sure the next issue will reveal Damien’s interest in targeting Deathstroke. I highly recommend this issue to fans of DC and The Teen Titans.    

REVIEW OVERVIEW
Overall
9.5
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Tom Zimm
I am a licensed clinical social worker and trauma therapist that works with children. I've been interested in comic book heroes since I was a young child. However, it's been in the last 3-4 years that I've been making the weekly trip to the local comic book store to redeem my pull list. DC's Rebirth really won me over, especially Geoff Johns' 80-page book. My favorite properties include The Flash and The Incredible Hulk. My criteria for a good comic book include taking stupid and fun seriously while remaining self-aware.