Green Lanterns #33 Review

After a really good run by Sam Humphries, his writing for Green Lanterns came to a close in issue #32. He’ll now be writing for Nightwing, and Nightwing’s writer, Tim Seeley, is taking over Green Lanterns. So they are switching books with each other. Tim Seeley starts us off with his first issue of Green Lanterns this week titled Work Release part one. I’m excited for what Tim Seeley has in store for us. His run on Nightwing was good so I anticipate a nice Green Lanterns run. Spoilers ahead.

What is this all about?

This issue starts off with John Stewart calling Simon Baz and Jessica Cruz out to C-873 A.K.A. the planet Mol. All life on it is threatened because its star is about to supernova.

We then immediately get a flash back to last week where we see Jessica visiting her therapist in Portland Oregon. The therapist is your typical dirty hipster looking character. She has the ratty beanie on, with over-sized glasses, a flower tattoo on her shoulder, a Buddha poster and the “hang in there” cat poster on her office wall. There is also a brick wall in her office which is totally Portland-esc. I feel like this is an odd scene, because after all, we know what Jessica has been through and I don’t really buy that if she truly does need therapy, this dirty hipster has anything to offer her. Anyways, the scene ends with the hipster therapist telling her she should get a job and get out into the “big wide world.” Right, ok… I get the irony in that since she just spent time 10 billion years in the past, and she flies through interstellar space as a Green Lantern. So perhaps this was a bit of humor.

Back to now, their mission. They are on planet Mol which is being showered with volcanic eruptions. Their task is to rescue the life forms of this planet who are trapped under molten rock. So they do what you wouldn’t expect, they swim right through the magma. But not to worry, their rings protect them from burning alive. As long as they keep their willpower up…

We now enter another flashback. This time it’s ‘last week’ in Simon’s life. He’s fixing a car engine in his garage when Sira comes out and starts bitching at him for not doing the laundry. Sira’s character is annoying, I hate when she gets attention in these books. She tells him to get a job or he has to find another place to live. Do we see a theme here? In both flashbacks Simon and Jessica are told to get jobs.

Back again to the planet Mol. They are trying to talk the inhabitants into leaving the planet so they can live, but they don’t want to leave. The planet is their God and they owe it to the planet to stay, and perish. Above the planet is an Ungaran military transport ship waiting to assist the Lanterns. Aboard the ship is Regent Anthene Vok and her daughter Liseth, who seems to be some sort of pop star on her own planet, from what I can gather. After frantically trying to help the inhabitants of Mol, Simon and Jessica are not able to talk them into leaving and their willpower begins to drop. Incoming gamma rays and high energy particles hit the Ungaran ship and part of it explodes. Simon hurries up to the ship while Jessica stays to help the creatures of Mol. Liseth perishes in the ships explosion while in the arms of her mother. We’ll have to find out what happens next time in issue #34.

REVIEW

This was a rough start to a new Green Lanterns run. I had a hard time even finishing it. The story was dry and uninteresting. I find myself not caring much about what happens next. This title seems to be following a very liberal SJW flow and I don’t like that. I feel like many DC titles are following that path lately as well. It makes me scared for the future of our comics. Other than that the art was great. Pansica is quite talented and his art is fantastic to admire. All-in-all, I don’t really recommend this issue. I feel like this is part one of a garbage filler story.

5 / 10

More Info

Reviewed by: Justin Swenson Green Lanterns #33 Written by: Tim Seeley Art by: Eduardo Pansica, Julio Ferreira, Alex Sollazzo Published by: DC Comics Release Date: October 18, 2017